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Historical Timeline of Mexico City

 

 
An Acrobat from the early Tlatilco Culture.
An Acrobat from the early Tlatilco Culture. Photo: Wikimedia Commons.

The Ancient Period

1250 BCE – 800 BCE
Among the earliest human settlements to leave verifiable artifiacts in the Valley of Mexico, the Tlatilco Culture thrived for hundreds of years in and near the Tlatilco neighborhood sandwiched between today’s Santa Maria la Ribera and Nueva Santa Maria neighborhoods.

200 BCE
The earliest buildings at Teotihuacan date from this period. Over the next four centuries, Totonac, Zapotec, Mixtec, and Maya peoples contribute to the rise of the Teotihuacan civilization.

100 CE
The Pyramid of the Sun, the largest pyramid at Teotihuacan is completed.

245-315 CE
The Xitle volcano, in what is today Tlalpan in the south of the city, erupts multiple times. In forming the Pedregal de San Ángel lava fields still visible across the south of Mexico City, most of what was likely the sophisticated city of Cuicuilco was destroyed. The fleeing Cuicuilcan people are thought to have had a strong influence on the only-then increasingly powerful Teotihuacan.

378
In January, Teotihuacan invades and subjugates what is today the Petén department in Guatemala. One of the most powerful Maya strongholds of the classical period, Tikal comes under Teotihuacan rule. Tikal was completely abandoned by the end of the 10th century. 

450
Teotihuacan reaches the peak of its civilization although prolific mural painting continues well into the next 200 years. 

 

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Atlantes de Tula
Tula de Allende in nearby Hidalgo. Photo: Wikimedia Commons

713
Tula, north of the city in the state of Hidalgo and today known as Tula de Allende, begins rising in stature and power, to eventually dominate what is today central Mexico. 

ca. 947
Topiltzin, the later ruler of Culhuacán, is born at about this time. Culhuacán, an agricultural village in what is today Iztapalapa, was likely settled by those migrating from the then only recently fallen Teotihuacan.  

1250
The king of Culhuacán, historically a Toltec refuge city, is persuaded by a group of Mexica people to permit them to settle in a relatively infertile patch of land called Chapultepec. In exchange the Mexica are believed to have served as mercenaries for Culhuacan.

1265
The first Xochimilca Lord, Acatonalli, founds a village on Cuauhilama hill, overlooking much of present day Xochimilco.

1309
The island of Iztacalco, then entirely within Lake Texcoco, is settled by Mexica farmers. It was to remain a relatively isolated island until the end of the colonial period, and an island until the mid-19th century. 

1325
The legendary founding of México-Tenochtitlan, capital of the Mexica empire.

1337
Dissident Mexica break away from Tenochtitlan to found México-Tlatelolco on the northern portion of their rather small island.

1426
Tezozomoc dies and bequeaths the Tepanec kingdom, today’s Tacubaya, to his sons Tayatzin and Maxtla.  Maxtla is believed to have poisoned Tayatzin.

1428
Maxtla, though, is soon overthrown by the Aztec Triple Alliance, representing the Mexica of Tenochtitlan, the Acolhua people of Texcoco, the remaining Tepanec people of Tlacopan. Tlacopan was the dominant Tepanec city, but a much weaker partner within the alliance than were Tenochtitlan and Texcoco.

1431–1472
Nezahualcoyōtl, (born April 28, 1402) only the most notable of the Triple-Alliance leaders, reigns over Texcoco, in a period remembered for his poetry and his aversion to blood sacrifice.

1450
By 1450, the Mexica people had come to dominate much of Mesoamerica.

1519
Arrival of the Spaniards. The Mexica leader, Moctezuma Xocoyotzin meets with Hernán Cortés on November 8.

1521
On August 13, México-Tenochtitlan falls to the invading Spanish army.


New Spain

1522
Hernán Cortés establishes the Spanish government of the new colony in the Coyoacán territory.

1531 
San Juan Diego sees the Virgin of Guadalupe on the Cerro de Tepeyac. The first of four apparitions occurred on December 9. 

1535
The Colony of New Spain is officially established. Mexico City, the Capital of New Spain, and therefore unofficially the capital of the Spanish Empire would within 100 years emerge as the most cosmopolitan, multicultural, and international of cities anywhere in the world of that time. It would remain so until Mexican Independence was achieved in 1821.

1542
The New Laws, ie; the New Laws of the Indies for the Good Treatment and Preservation of the Indians, forbade the enslavement or forced labor of indigenous people.

1551
The Royal and Pontifical University of Mexico was founded, the first university in North America. It was renamed the University of Mexico only after Mexican independence was won. It survived as such until it was abolished by Maximiliano in 1865. 

1552
An agreement was reached whereby the cost of a new Metropolitan Cathedral would be shared by the Spanish Crown, the conquerors, and the indigenous peoples under the direct authority of the Archbishop of New Spain.

1559
Phillip II grants the title of “city” to Xochimilco.

1573 – 1813
Work begins on the Metropolitan Cathedral of Mexico City to replace a smaller church built on the same site over the Templo Mayor. Construction continues for another 240 years.

1583 
The Colegio de San Ildefonso results from the consolidation of the Colegio Máximo de San Pedro & San Pablo and its seminary with three other Jesuit seminaries. The building presently bearing the same name was begun somewhat later and expanded numerous times over the coming centuries.

1610
The church of Santiago de Tlatelolco is completed on what is today la Plaza de las tres culturas in Tlatelolco.

1692
A riot breaks out, and is captured vividly in a writing called the Letter of Don Carlos de Sigüenza y Góngora to Admiral Pez Recounting the incidents of the Corn Riot in Mexico City, June 8, 1692. Other very important documents were preserved by Don Carlos de Sigüenza y Góngora himself when the Viceroyal Palace began to burn. These are preserved in the Historical Archive of Mexico City.

1703
The El Parían market was an early attempt to get vendors out of the Zocalo. With not complete success, the centralized public market building served as Mexico City’s first such market until the building was demolished in 1843.

1734
On 31 July, the first stone was laid for the newly founded Colegio de San Ignacio de Loyola Vizcaínas. It has served as a school ever since. 

1759
Production begins at the Loreto paper mill, and continues until 1991. Today, it’s the site of the Plaza Loreto shopping center. 

1769
Construction begins on the Palace of the Counts of San Mateo de Valparaiso. The building is finished in 1772, and can be seen, largely in its original state at the corner of Isabel la Católica and Venustiano Carranza in the city center.

Museum of the City of Mexico
The Museum of the City of New York rests on the city’s most famous cornerstone.

1777
Rehabilitation work begins on a dilapidated older structure, and probably included the discovery of an Aztec serpent’s head carving. The ancient head was incorporated as a cornerstone into the newer palace of the Count of Santiago de Calimaya. Today, the serpent’s head can be seen still serving as a cornerstone of the Museum of the City of Mexico to which the building was converted in 1964, having been purchased from the descendants of the Count of Santiago de Calimaya in 1960.

1785
Construction begins on a stately home for Viceroy Bernardo de Gálvez, for whom Galveston Texas was named, on the highest hill in Chapultepec. The building later came to be known as the Chapultepec Castle.

1790
The Aztec Sun Stone is retrieved from the ground at the foot of the Metropolitan Cathedral

1796 – 1803
Manuel Tolsá casts the 26 ton El Caballito, his depiction of Charles IV of Spain. Today, the statue is outside the National Museum of Art on Calle Tacuba in the city center, in the plaza later renamed for Tolsá. The statue remains the second largest cast bronze statue in the world.

1799
The Viceroy Miguel José de Azanza orders 13 young men arrested in Mexico City during the Conspiracy of the Machetes. Accused of planning an assault on the palace and taking the viceroy prisoner, the conspiracy illustrates the growing tension between criollos and the Spanish ruling class.


Independent Mexico 

1810
The War of Independence begins after a call to arms by parish priest Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla.

1813
The Palacio de Minería, built to house the Royal School of Mines and Mining of the Royal Court, officially opened and still stands on Calle Tacuba. Today a museum operated by the National University, construction began in 1797. It was build by architect and sculptor, Manuel Tolsá, and today faces the plaza bearing his name.  

1821
Mexico City is invaded by the ‘Army of Three Guarantees’ that fought against the Spaniards, headed by Agustín de Iturbide.

1823
Iturbide’s empire is overthrown by insurgents.

1824
A January 31 Acta Constitutiva de la Federación, and the October 4 Federal Constitution fixed the political and administrative organization, under Article 50, gave the new Mexican Congress the right to choose where the federal government would be located. The choice was official on 18 November, 1824, when Congress delineated a surface area of two leagues square (8,800 acres) centered on the Zocalo. Coyoacán, Xochimilco, Mexicaltzingo, and Tlalpan, all remained parts of the State of Mexico.

1832
The Panteon de San Fernando begins accepting those ready to be interred. It continues to accept some of the 19th century’s most illustrious figures until 1871. 

1847
On September 14, U.S. general Winfield Scott enters Mexico City, marking the end of organized Mexican resistance to the US invasion.

1857
The Constitution of 1857 goes into effect.

1857
The territory of Coyoacan is incorporated into the Federal District. It was formally made into a delegation in 1928.

1864
Construction begins on the Paseo de la Emperatriz, intended to connect Chapultepec Castle with the Zocalo and the Metropolitan Cathedral. Today, it is known as Paseo de la Reforma.

1866
Napolean III withdraws support for the Second Mexican Empire, dooming the reign of Maximilian. He survived until June of 1867 when he was captured and executed by Juarez in Queretaro, an event depicted in Eduard Manet’s sensational series of paintings.

 


The Porfiriato, The Porfirio Díaz Period (1876 – 1911)

1888
Construction begins on the notorious Lecumberri Palace Prison complex which opened as a prison, primarily for Porfirio Diaz’s political enemies. Architect and designer, Miguel S. Macedo would be imprisoned there himself during the Mexican Revolution.

1900
Construction begins on the Angel de la Independencia monument. The work is completed some ten years later in time for the centennial of the country’s independence.

1901
On November 18, police arrest 41 male attendees at a dance near the avenue, San Juan de Letran (today’s Eje Central). Some had been dressed as women, and it’s likely a 42nd was a nephew of Porfirio Díaz who only barely escaped arrest. The modern LGBTTIQ movement in the city still traces its history to this event. 

1903
California immigrants Walter and Frank Sanborn opened Mexico’s first soda fountain and lunch counter across from the Palacio de Correos. This first Sanborns location is still in operation, but the chain acquired its more famous branch, two blocks south at La Casa de los Azulejos, in 1919.

1904
Porfirio Díaz lays the first stone of the Palacio de Bellas Artes. The building would not be finished until 1934.  

1904 – 1911
Architect Silvio Contri begins work on what is today the Neoclassical and Renaissance style National Museum of Art (MUNAL). It was built to house the Secretariat of Communications and Public Works.

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Monument to the Revolution

1910
Work begins on a new Federal Legislative Palace, planned since 1897. The project wouldn’t be completed until 1938, by which time it was converted into the Monumento de la Revolucion.


The Mexican Revolution – 1910 -1920

1910 to 1920
The Mexican Revolution
begins in earnest with the election of Francisco A Madero in a disputed 1910 election.

1913
From February 9 to 19, Mexico’s Ten Tragic Days begin with Huerta’s bombardment of the city, and ends with former President Francisco I. Madero, and his Vice President, José María Pino Suárez asassinated outside of the Lecumberri Palace Prison

1914
On 15 July, (seemingly moments before WWI erupts in Europe), Huerta bows to pressure, resigns the presidency and flees the country. Victorious “Pancho” Villa forces, accompanied by revolutionary forces under Venustiano Carranza and Alvaro Obregon re-enter the city.  

1914
On December 6, 1914, the forces of Emiliano Zapata enter Mexico City, following the famous December 4 meeting with “Pancho” Villa in Xochimilco. Villa’s “Division del Norte,” having arrived the previous July, was a heavily armed, near-professional military force. Nothing like the ragtag “Zapatistas” had ever been seen, at least not in organized numbers, in Mexico City. The two armies remained in the city through the winter. 

1917
The Constitutional Congress approved a new constitution on 5 February 1917. It was the successor to the Constitution of 1857, and served as a model for both the Russian Constitution of 1918 and the Weimar Constitution of 1919.

1920
Álvaro Obregón becomes president. Redistribution of lands to peasants begins in fulfillment of promises made during the revolution.

The 20th Century

1921
Obregón designates José Vasconcelos as Education Minister. A period of rich cultural output begins.

1926
The widow of  Andrew Carnegie donates a plaster replica of the Diplodocus Carnegie, to the El Chopo Museum. The Jurassic dinosaur was to define the museum’s identity for decades thereafter.

1954
The Ciudad Universitaria campus construction begins in Coyoacán.

1957
On July 28, a serious earthquake causes up to 160 deaths and topples the iconic Angel de la Independencia. The statue broke into several pieces and took a year to restore.

1957
On September 23, President Adolfo Ruiz Cortines and city boss, Ernesto P. Uruchurtu official open the Mercado de Sonora, just southeast of the city center. It was part of an ongoing effort to get more informal vendors off the streets and into more public marketplaces. 

1958
The Casa Azul, the former home of Frida Kahlo, is converted into a museum honoring the painter’s life and work.

1967
Construction work on Line 1 of the Metro leads to the discovery of an altar dedicated to Ehécatl, usually interpreted as an aspect of Quetzalcoatl, and a god of wind. The altar today forms the centerpiece of the Pino Suárez Metro station.

1968
As Mexico City hosts the XIX Olympic Games, increasingly large demonstrations culminated in the October 2 Tlatelolco Massacre. The Mexican army opened fire on protesters and killed a number that was never determined. Most likely several hundred died in or as the result of the attack in the Plaza de las Tres Culturas in Tlatelolco. 

1969
Inauguration of the Metro rapid transportation system.

1970
Mexico City hosts the World Cup.

1974
The Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana (La UAM”) is established in Xochimilco.

1976
The Basilica of Guadalupe, by architect Pedro Ramírez Vázquez, opens.

Cabeza de Juarex in Agua Prieta
The Cabeza de Juárez has a museum inside and is sometimes considered a symbol for the whole eastern side of Mexico City.

1976
The Cabeza de Juárez is constructed in Colonia Agua Prieta in the eastern side of the city. The work had to be completed by the brother of artist David Alfaro Siqueiros, as the artist died before it could be completed.

1978
On 21 February electrical company workers began digging at the “island of the dogs,” so named because it was slightly elevated and inhabited by street dogs during the then-not-infrequent flooding of the neighborhood. The workers hit a pre-Hispanic monolith which turned out to be a huge stone disk with a relief later determined to depict Coyolxauhqui, Huitzilopochtli’s sister, and dated to the end of the 15th century. Thus began renewed interest in the Templo Mayor site.

1985
On September 19, a powerful earthquake rocks the city center devastating many neighborhoods. Up to 100,000 people are believed to have been killed.

1986
Mexico City once again hosts the World Cup.

1987
The Historic Center and Xochimilco is declared World Heritage Sites by UNESCO.

 


21st Century Mexico City

2002
The TURIBÚS (double-decker open-air bus) network opens.

2007
The Campus of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) is declared a World
Heritage Site by UNESCO.

2010
Mexican cuisine is declared Intangible World Heritage by UNESCO.

2012
The Alameda, the oldest city park in the Americas, is rehabilitated and remodeled.

2013
Museo Jumex opens a permanent exhibition space in Polanco for the Jumex Collection, widely considered the most important collection of Latin American art in the world.

2017
On September 19, the 32nd anniversary of the powerful 1985 earthquake, and just hours after the commemorative earthquake safety drills, yet another deadly earthquake strikes the city, this time killing 370 persons in and near to Mexico City.

 

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