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Calzada de Tlalpan

Today's Calzada de Tlalpan dates from a road begun in 1432. Very early on, it was called the Ixtapalapan road. This began at the Templo Mayor, crossed the island southward. Then it struck out across the lake. It continued south all the way to what is today the Center of Tlalpan.

At the time of its construction, both this and the Tepeyac ​​Causeway to the north were parts of a massive hydrological management project. The point of the road, as much as to provide access as a road, was to keep the brackish, salty waters out of the fresh water to the west in the main body of Lake Texcoco. The original raised causeway was 20 meters across!

The road is probably still most famous for the Spanish having marched up it on November 8, 1519. A monument in the Historic Center marks where the meeting was said to have taken place. Competing testimonies will place the meeting as far south as Metro Villa de Cortés.

All of the listings below are on or very near to the Calzada de Tlalpan, a vital city artery, even today.

Electric Transport Museum

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Army and Air Force Museum

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Mercado Portales & Vicinity

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Parque Masayoshi Ohira

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Mercado Postal Zona, Benito Juárez

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Glorieta Postal

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Parque José Refugio Ménez (Parque Odesa)

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Santa Rita de Casia Church, Villa de Cortés

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Mercado La Moderna

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Casa de Cultura Moderna

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Metro San Antonio Abad

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Metro Viaducto

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Metro Xola

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Metro Villa de Cortés

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Metro Nativitas

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Metro Portales

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Metro Ermita

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Metro General Anaya

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Metro Tasqueña

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National Museum of the Interventions – Churubusco Monastery

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General Anaya Monument

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Church Hospital de Jesus Nazareno

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San Andrés Tetepilco Church & Town

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