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Federal Police Interactive Museum

Open - Limited Services / Capacity

museo interactivo de la policía federal

The Interactive Museum of the Federal Police is a museum dedicated to public security. It’s especially dedicated to children and younger guests. The museum sees its role in strengthening the culture of legality, and promoting the values of a non-profit society.

The museum is headquartered in an important architectural work: the former Belén Mill. The building was ordered built by Hernán Cortés himself. It spent long centuries as the centerpiece to a famous ranch.

About the Building

The complex is documented to have belonged to Cortés until the late 16th century. Property records thereafter are remarkably intact for a site this old. It operated as a mill through several owners until a Jesuit group acquired the property in 1781. They used it to produce food products bound for their missions in the Philippines. The Mill of Our Lady of Belem and the entire Ranch of Coscacoaco were then seized in 1781 after the Jesuits were banished from New Spain.

The entire property was then turned back over to private hands. An 1828 surveys described it surrounded by pasture, and tilled farmland. A paper mill was established in the late 19th century to be powered by the abundant waterfalls in the area. That mill was soon producing three tons per day. In 1910, the ranch and mill were sold to the Federal Government still largely intact.

The Interactive Museum

Today, the Molino de Belén de las Flores (the Bethlem of the Flowers Mill) is stilled owned by the Federal Government. Museum staff conduct tours that include a history of the Federal Police. There are also segments on their equipment, infrastructure, and laboratories, and an explanation of the seven divisions of the force.

A third and final section is a tribute to the men and women who’ve fallen in the line of duty.

For international visitors, the historical ranch and grounds are enticing to say the least. The mounted police have a strong presence here, and the presence of horses can’t help but have a positive effect on visitors.

Hours: Tuesday through Sunday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

 

Mexico City

Cultural Capital of the Americas