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Ticomán Cablebús Station

Open - Limited Services / Capacity

Cablebús Ticoman

 

The Ticomán Cablebús station is the first stop on the length of Line 1. It provides much-needed transport relief to the Politécnico Metro station on the other side of the campus.

  • Just about everything you see between the Indios Verdes station and here is the Politécnico (IPN) campus. It’s the National Polytechnic University in Mexico City.
  • Sights include an airplane out the left-hand windows. That’s part of the IPN Mechanical Engineering School. You’ll see the giant nearly circular Cinvestav building(s) out the other side. That’s the Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional. You’ll pass just south and west of the building.
  • Not part of IPN, the famous Pañuelito is a 1967 modernist church by Felix Candela and Enrique De La Mora. It’s visible essentially right outside the Indios Verdes station.
  • The community of Ticomán is an ancient one. Today a good half-dozen neighborhoods (all of them below you) bear the Ticomán name in the area.
  • Ticomán was at its height in the Pre-Classical period. The people are thought to have been Otomi. On the northwest bank of ancient Lake Texcoco, the town name could be translated as “man-made hill.”
  • The station logo, designed by Lance Wyman, recalls one of the clay figurines found in the area. (These are today in the collection of the Anthropology Museum). The figure depicts a player of the ancient ball game.
  • Wyman designed the original Metro logos in the late 1960s. This was after the acclaim he received for the logo of the 1968 Olympic games.

The station grows increasingly important for IPN students and workers. Still, most international visitors won’t be getting off at the Ticomán Cablebús station. The views are exceptional nonetheless.

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